10 June 2017

A who in lieu of a what?

I wrote this in 2014, while we were searching for our house.
-
On Monday we made an offer on the aforementioned, rambling ninety-nine year old folk Victorian farmhouse with Depression Era sun room.

It was a good offer, but by far not our best offer.

We sat in the deep cushioned chairs and signed our names and initials more times than we could count, and promised to sign even more papers and write a few large checks upon request, and then we went home.

And we waited and schemed, and we talked and we dreamed about how we'd live in our rambling ninety-nine year old folk Victorian farmhouse with Depression Era sun room when it was ours, and we were anxious and at peace, strange as that may seem.

The next day we waited again, and we were patient, or at least we told ourselves we were patient, and we made ourselves not send text messages to the realtor, nor call her telephone, nor write her emails enquiring.

We waited.

Grown up things like buying a house take lots of time, and we are doing our very best to assure ourselves and all parties involved that we are responsible, adult-type people who handle their affairs as such.

After breakfast this morning we drove to the store for tractor owners, even though we don't own any tractors. We needed food for the one dog, two rabbits, six chickens, and an indeterminate number of semi-feral, mildly retarded cats that live here, so they won't get hungry and eat us in our sleep.

We were on our way back home with the food for the animals when the realtor called.

News! She has news to tell us! Maybe it's time to sign some more papers or a write a check!

I answered the phone and the realtor informed me that the seller of the rambling ninety-nine year old folk Victorian farmhouse with Depression Era sun room that the universe that doesn't care wants only us to have, has decided to do a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure instead.

A what in lieu of... huh?

I had never heard of a Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure before so I asked the realtor to explain, and she said,
A Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure essentially means that the seller is going to give the keys to the house to the bank and quit any claim she ever had to the house and walk away peacefully to avoid having the foreclosure mark on her credit history, and that the bank will shortly take possession of the house.
Which pretty much means that the rambling ninety-nine year old folk Victorian farmhouse with Depression Era sun room, which we have come to think of as kinda, sorta, maybe s'posed to be ours is no longer for sale.

I'm told that if we're patient and vigilant we might be able to get it for a better price somewhere down the road. Unless some other buyer gets there first... even though technically we are here first.

That doesn't matter to the bank. Banks have their own special rules.

The first rule is the bank doesn't care.
The second rule is the bank gets to make all the rules.

Fuck!

What else could I say?

-
Originally posted on red clay blues.